Benjamin Studebaker

Yet Another Attempt to Make the World a Better Place by Writing Things

Tag: Bernie Sanders

The Problem With Fact Checkers is that They’re Journalists, Not Academics

The row between the fact checking websites and Medicare-for-all supporters has continued over the past couple weeks. I briefly weighed in to point out that, studies aside, it’s difficult to estimate the cost because it’s impossible for us to know what level of healthcare spending will, in the long-run, be politically acceptable. The attempts to get an estimate all involve assuming particular levels of spending ex ante. The Republicans canĀ claim that we would need to continue spending 18% of GDP, but they don’t know. Bernie Sanders canĀ claim that we would be able to impose Medicare’s level of compensation, but he doesn’t know. Just like in other countries with systems like this, the level of expenditure would constantly be up for political renegotiation. Britain spends 7% of its GDP on its National Health Service. Will we spend 7% or 18% or somewhere in between? Anyone who tells you that they know for sure is lying.

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Why Abdul El-Sayed Lost

Abdul El-Sayed ran on a left-wing platform, but lost his bid for the democratic nomination for Governor of Michigan by more the 20 points. There are some who will argue that El-Sayed’s loss signifies a lack of popularity for left-wing politics, but El-Sayed lost for contingent reasons.

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The Decline of the 20th Century Political Campaign

Political campaigns started getting expensive in the 1960s, when television advertising became the next big thing in campaigning. Even before TV, reaching people was hard work. You needed to knock on doors, phone bank, and send out mailings. All of this required a lot of dedicated activists and dedicated dollars. And so politicians depended very heavily on the activists and donors who could provide these things. All of this is in the process of changing. Activists and dollars are becoming less important than they used to be. They still matter, but not as much. And as time goes on, they grow weaker.

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The Candace Owens Problem

This year has been politically very stale, and so I continue to get my kicks from the strange things Kanye West coughs up on Twitter. Kanye is a window into the American id. He doesn’t read and he doesn’t listen to anybody. He goes out of his way to avoid other people’s interpretations. This enables him to more directly access what’s happening, but it robs him of the intellectual tools necessary to refine his understanding. Recently Kanye tweeted:

Who is Candace Owens? I’d never heard of her. Kanye made me look her up, and looking up Candace Owens taught me something–despite Bernie Sanders, despite DSA, despite all the left activism in the United States over the past few years, there are still millions and millions of Americans who have no idea a left alternative to the Democratic Party establishment exists.

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3 Brexit Futures: Stories from Next Year

In Spring 2019, the UK is meant to leave the EU. Prime Minister Theresa May soldiers on, but many think she can’t get the job done. Former Prime Ministers John Major and Tony Blair gave ruthless speeches again May, and EU’s lead Brexit negotiator accused May of being “vague” and “not credible”. Major–a member of May’s own party–was especially vicious:

It all has me thinking about what comes next. How might these Brexit negotiations conclude? Three possibilities stick out to me.

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