Benjamin Studebaker

Yet Another Attempt to Make the World a Better Place by Writing Things

Tag: Accelerationism

Five Forms of Retreat

In the Roman Empire, during the Crisis of the 3rd Century, everything began falling apart. The army was swapping emperors out left and right, and the political system could no longer generate the legitimacy or stability that had prevailed in the two centuries prior. Chunks of the empire lost faith in the ability of the central authority to restore order, and began looking to their own defences. It was bleak:

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Comparing Keynesian Neocorporatism and Market Socialism

There is a lot of fuzziness and misunderstanding about what the left is trying to do, economically. A while back, I discussed some of the things which distinguish postwar liberals–who remain committed to reforming capitalism–from democratic socialists, who seek to one day abolish capitalism outright. Today I want to get into a bit more detail and discuss more precisely how these economic models work. The case I want to make to you is that despite what you may hear, the postwar liberals and democratic socialists have more overlap in their proposals than either side realises.

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Why Kanye West Likes Donald Trump

Kanye West is getting a lot of heat for appearing to come out as a Donald Trump supporter. Kanye is a much better poet than he is a prose artist, and when he speaks extemporaneously he tends to ramble. This often causes him to make flippant comments which become defining soundbites, drowning out the rest of what he says. Many people would be disinclined to take him seriously, and I’m sure some of you question whether this is a suitable topic for this blog. But there’s value in dissecting the views of people who seem politically unsophisticated–this is the only way we can come to understand the people outside of our bubbles. Read the rest of this entry »

Who Should You Vote For? My Best Case for Each Choice

When they write about what you should do with your vote, most people pick one side and make a case. But there are a lot of arguments for different courses of action and I think it’s more interesting to lay them out and let you decide which one you think is strongest. These are the very best arguments I can think of for any political choice you might want to make on November 8, consistent with what I know about how policy and political institutions work–I’m not going to pretend that Gary Johnson’s tax plan makes sense or that climate change is a Chinese hoax.

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